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Bio-eye Presentation Slide Set

Page 7 of 11


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61. An artificial eye and a template made from the artificial eye. This template is used to mark the conjunctiva to indicate where to drill the hole for the motility/support peg.


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62. A patient with an artificial eye template in place. The location for the motility/support peg is marked through the hole on the conjunctiva.


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63. Starting a pilot hole using a syringe needle in the area where the hole will be drilled for the motility/support peg. The pilot hole is made using graduated needles (21 to 16 gauge) to enure proper angle of the final hole, which is made using a power drill.


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64. Drilling of the hole for the motility/support peg. In this case, a flexible corded drill is being used. Other drills are available for this procedure.


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65. A patient in the supine position after the hole has been drilled for the motility/support peg. The shaft of a cotton-tip applicator has been placed into the hole to confirm that it is drilled perpendicular to the frontal plane of the patient. Proper angle is important for best results.


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66. The shaft of a cotton-tip applicator is used to measure the depth of the hole for the motility/support peg. The hole should be drilled to a depth of 10 to 13 mm. The diameter of the hole will vary depending on the type of peg used: the sleeved peg requires a hole with a diameter of 3.8 mm; the standard peg requires a diameter of 3.0 mm.


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67. Two basic types of pegs are provided with each Bio-eye hydroxyapatite orbital implant: a flat-headed temporary peg and a ball-headed motility/support peg. A new locking-socket variation of the ball-headed peg is also provided with each implant, as are variations that incorporate a sleeve.


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68. After drilling, a temporary flat-headed peg is placed into the peg hole. The patient's artificial eye is placed back into the socket and will be worn with the temporary peg for 1 month.


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69. The temporary flat-headed peg is replaced with a ball-headed motility/support peg. This peg should be placed into the hole immediately after removing the temporary peg to prevent tissue swelling. Swelling narrows the hole and makes it difficult to insert the peg.


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70. A well-seated motility/support peg. Note that only the ball head of the peg extends above the conjunctiva. This indicates a good fit.


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